AL MICHAELS

Play-by-Play, “Sunday Night Football” & “Thursday Night Football

Al Michaels is the play-by-play voice for NBC’s Sunday Night Football and the network’s new Thursday Night Football series. NBC is the only network with two primetime NFL packages. One of the most renowned sports broadcasters of all time and the commentator called “TV’s best play-by-play announcer” by the Associated Press, Michaels in January 2017 completed his 11th season as the voice of NBC’s Sunday Night Football and record 31st campaign as the play-by-play announcer of the NFL in primetime.

SNF has been primetime television’s #1 show for a record six consecutive years (2011-16) – an accomplishment matched only by American Idol since 1950. From the 2008-13 NFL seasons, Sunday Night Football won six consecutive Emmy Awards for Outstanding Live Sports Series – a Sports Emmy record – and won again following the 2015 NFL season.

In February 2015 in Arizona, Michaels called his ninth Super Bowl – the thrilling four-point New England Patriots victory over the Seattle Seahawks in the most-watched show in U.S. TV history (average of 114.4 million viewers). Michaels’ previous Super Bowl — Super Bowl XLVI, which Michaels called with Collinsworth on NBC in February 2012 — was the most-viewed program in U.S. television history at the time.

At the 2016 Rio Olympics, Michaels served a host on NBC’s daytime coverage. He hosted NBCSN’s weekday afternoon and NBC’s weekend daytime coverage of the 2014 Olympic Winter Games in Sochi, and served in the same role for NBC at the 2012 Olympic Games in London, the most-watched event in U.S. television history, and the 2010 Olympic Winter Games in Vancouver. In 2015, Michaels served as host of the first events in the “PBC on NBC” boxing series.

Michaels’ autobiography, You Can’t Make This Up (released Nov. 18, 2014), reached the top 10 on the New York Times best-seller list for hard-cover, non-fiction titles.

One of television’s most respected journalists, Michaels has covered more major sports events than any sportscaster, including 20 years as the play-by-play voice of Monday Night Football. He is the only commentator to call the Super Bowl, World Series, NBA Finals and host the Stanley Cup Final for network television. In addition, Michaels called the classic 1985 championship boxing match between “Sugar” Ray Leonard and “Marvelous” Marvin Hagler.

Among his many accolades, Michaels has captured seven Emmy Awards – six for Outstanding Sports Personality – Play-by-Play and one in 2011 for the Lifetime Achievement Award, and has three times (1980, 1983 and 1986) received the NSSA Award from the National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association; he was inducted into the NSSA Hall of Fame in 1998. Michaels was named Sportscaster of the Year in 1996 by the American Sportscasters Association, and, in 1991, he was named Sportscaster of the Year by the Washington Journalism Review.

Michaels received three major industry honors in 2013. First, he was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame with the prestigious Pete Rozelle Radio & Television Award, which distinguishes long-time exceptional contributions to radio and television in professional football. Michaels was then inducted into the Television Academy Hall of Fame by the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, which annually recognizes television’s most distinguished “innovators and icons.” Finally, in December 2013, the Sports Broadcasting Hall of Fame recognized Michaels for his “excellence and lifetime achievement,” and he was inducted as a member of its 2013 Hall of Fame Class.

Michaels garnered his first Sportscaster of the Year award in 1980, the year he made his memorable call, “Do you believe in miracles? Yes!” on the U.S. men’s hockey team’s dramatic upset victory over the USSR at the Lake Placid Winter Olympics. His reputation for Olympic acumen grew with his coverage of figure skating and hockey at the 1984 Winter Games in Sarajevo, and track & field and road cycling at the Summer Games in Los Angeles. He also called hockey during the 1988 Calgary Winter Olympic Games.

Regarded as one of the best baseball announcers of all time, Michaels was ABC’s lead baseball play-by-play announcer during the network’s coverage of Major League Baseball. He has also earned praise as a journalist and became just the second sportscaster in history to receive a News Emmy nomination for his coverage of the San Francisco earthquake during the 1989 World Series.

Michaels currently resides in Los Angeles, California.